How To Install A Body Kit Part 1 – Painting

Alright. First things first. I don’t guarantee any work you get done to your car or any work you do yourself. If you should mess up your car, well that’s your fault and don’t blame me! Okay, let me start out by saying that I highly recommend getting a body kit installed by an auto body technician or someone who has done body work and feels comfortable completing the necessary work. Ceramic Pro are the latest advancement in paint protection Melbourne, providing a high gloss finish, long-lasting durable protection, and an easy to maintain surface.

If you insist on installing the kit yourself, there are some things to consider.

What color are you going to paint your body kit?

Where are you going to paint?

How are you going to paint your body kit?

Do you have the right tools to install the kit yourself?

And are you going to paint your entire car or just the body kit?(Should you decide to get your car painted professionally, but not get the kit installed, skip the below steps.)

I personally recommend painting the kit the same color as your car, but that’s personal opinion. Body kits can look really sharp if they are combined with vinyl graphics or even other custom paint work to tie the entire car together. I recommend finding your vehicles specific paint codes. Most of them can be found through the DuPont registry or through your local dealer.

Okay. So finding a place to paint is next. Many professional paints are very temperature specific. Should you decide to use one of these, you’ll need some big equipment and some serious painting skills. Also, for the integrity of your paint, find a dry environment that it virtually dust and dirt free. You will get a better smoother paint job in a clean environment. Whether you decide to use an aerosol or paint gun and air compressor, a clean environment is a must. You should also consider investing in a throw away or “keeper” set of paint coveralls. A great deal of dirt can be brought in on street clothes.

Painting is a delicate process that takes time and PATIENCE! Patience is a must and there is no substitute for patience when it comes to painting. The best paint you can buy will look like crap if you don’t take the time and follow the instructions.

Before you begin painting, I highly recommend doing a sort of dry install. Find out where the pieces going, take all of the pieces that need to be removed off your car, and find all of the places you’re going to have to bolt down in order to get a proper fit.
Don’t remove any sticky things yet and if needed find the places you need to drill and drill them. Clean up and get your shop ready to paint. It will be much easier to get your pieces on if your car has been prepared before hand.

Depending on what type of paint you’re planning on using can depend on which steps you’re going to have to take, but generally there are only 3. Primer, color, clear coat.

Primer is the foundation of a great paint job. Many body kits come pre-primered, but depending on the paint you’re using you may need to redo the primer. Such as any candy or pearlescent colors.

Color! Yes, its pretty and can be a headache. Color paint is the only reason for a paint job. If we didn’t have color, we’d all be driving around in hideous primer grey vehicles. You will spend a good deal of time on color. If you are doing a candy, you’ll spend even more time on color. There can be many variations on this step. Flash times and layer thickness make or break a paint job at this point. So remember “PATIENCE!”

Clear coat is another great step that can make or break your look. A good clear coat will make waxing and just looking at your car a dream. A bad one will look like someone tried to paint your car with nail polish.

My best advice is follow the instructions on your paint and always spray at a 90 degree angle. Most paints work well with a spray pattern about 6 to 7 inches away from a vehicle. Always spray side to side in an over lapping pattern and never stop on one spot. Should you stop, you’ll get high spots that will not dry correctly and you’ll have a “orange peel” paint job. Should you have an odd piece to paint, take time to mentally pre-paint the spot. Walk your painting route and try to follow your contours correctly. This is all part of that patience step. If you’re going do it, do it with care and patience for the right steps.

Alright. Part 2 of this piece is next and it cover installing the kit once you’ve finished painting it. Thank you for reading.

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Thank You for your time,

Ivory Blackwell

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